Hope after Las Vegas

I consider that our present sufferings are not worth comparing with the glory that will be revealed in us. For the creation waits in eager expectation for the children of God to be revealed. For the creation was subjected to frustration, not by its own choice, but by the will of the one who subjected it, in hope that the creation itself will be liberated from its bondage to decay and brought into the freedom and glory of the children of God. Romans 8:18-21

Last Sunday night a single gunman murdered almost 60 people, including himself, at a concert in Las Vegas. He wounded over 500 more victims. It was the largest mass killing in modern U.S. his­tory. Presi­dent Trump described the attack as “pure evil.” All eyes are on Las Vegas as authorities tend to the wounded and sociologists attempt to sort out what went wrong–yet again.

About 40 million people visit Las Vegas each year. Many travelers arrive hoping for big winnings in a casino. Others hope for sen­sual gratification in uninhibited indulgence. The hope for a jackpot is usually in vain. A hope for uninhibited gratification is almost always frustrated in the hidden recesses of the soul.

Las Vegas has long been known for stealing hope (along with many other things) from its guests. Unfortunately and unfairly, the city now also will be known as the unfortunate site of our nation’s most deadly massacre. Funerals of the victims are just beginning, but already fingers are pointing in blame. Cries from prominent voices about gun control and mental illness permeate the media.

In the aftermath of the shooting, show lights in Las Vegas remain undimmed. The slot machines continue to steal hope and the carnal spectacles steal virtue. But in the shadows, victims of the shooting and their families around the nation suffer the unspeakable agony of mass murder and carnage. It’s not fair, but their pain is unrelenting nonetheless. Both the world and its inhabitants are broken. In the ancient contest of nature versus nurture, neither can restrain evil. Nature destroys life with seeming randomness. Human killers are just as random and just as deadly.

A couple weeks ago, we concluded a month of natural disaster for coastal Texas, Florida, and the Caribbean islands. It was the worst of nature on display. How ironic that we give the hurricanes names like Harvey and Irma as if to humanize the destruction from nature. October already has become a month of human disaster in Nevada. What happened in Las Vegas was the worst of humanity on display. How ironic that we seek answers in nature for the brokenness of human behavior.

Almost 2,000 years ago, the Apostle Paul wrote that “the creation was subjected to frustration.” In short, the world is frustrated. Both nature and people are fractured. Life goes off track without reason or explanation. We may apply political and scientific Band-Aids in desperate measures, but ultimately our fixes are futile. Hurricanes, earthquakes and torna­does continue to devastate our cities. Cancer and crippling diseases continue to lay waste to our bodies. Terrorists and criminals continue to infiltrate our societies. Accidents still claim unwil­ling and unprepared victims. When things go wrong, we have few satisfying fixes. We’re unable to restrain evil. Death still reigns.

Gun control may or may not be a prudent political discussion in this context. Mental illness may or may not be a helpful discussion in this situation. But evil will not be eradicated by politicians or social scientists.

Why? Why does all this evil occur? Many people who pose the “why” question answer it with talking points about gun control or mental illness. The Apostle Paul offers us a much deeper answer, although it can be summarized in one little word – sin.

The world is broken because sin entered back in the Garden of Eden and spread through the whole world, including my heart and yours. Sin destroys everything it touches. Since sin has saturated our entire world, our entire world is broken. If the story ended there, we would have no hope.

Fortunately, the story doesn’t end there. The Apostle Paul also wrote that “creation itself will be liberated from its bondage to decay and brought into the glorious freedom of the children of God.” That gives us hope.

In the end, there is hope for Las Vegas–and Texas and Florida and Puerto Rico. Our hope is not in gun control, but in redemption. Our hope is not in in better police security, but in better human freedom, the liberty Christ will bring when he returns to reign in glory. Then, and only then, pure evil will be defeated in both nature and nurture.

If Las Vegas has you reeling, pick up a Bible and read through Romans chapter 8. There you can find hope while living in a sin-sick world.

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